Hiring operations

6 clever ways to get your team involved in hiring.

The best hiring is done as a team. And yet your team is struggling to find the time to do their part. Not because they don't care, but because they're too busy. Here are 6 things you can do to make it easier for them to be involved so that you can hire someone great together.

Your team is busy! Client projects to complete, features to ship, events to plan - there are always big important things happening. Exciting but also challenging, especially when tasks pop up around hiring that require time, thoughtfulness and intention.

Your team wants to put in the effort toward finding a great new colleague, but they end up spending time on the wrong things, like looking for CVs that are buried deep in email threads, writing a job description from scratch instead of using the existing template or searching for a conversation with a candidate..the list goes on.

This is just what happens when there are a million things to do and hiring is one that comes up sporadically enough that it takes significant time energy to get everything together that's needed to do it. Context switching- it's an eternal struggle. And frankly, it's a hurdle that keeps your team from being engaged and excited about hiring.

Constant context switching keeps your team from giving hiring tasks the intention and focus they need.

There are some easy and actionable steps you can take to make it easier for your team, however. Do these 6 things and they'll be able to join in on hiring effectively while enjoying it too:

1. Make it a project.
Keep your team from feeling like hiring is a side gig that they have to find time for in between the tasks of their "real job". Instead give hiring the status of any other project at your company. Chances are you already have processes set up for projects. Make use of those for your next hire. If projects involve kickoffs, stand-ups and retrospectives then do those for each new job opening. Making it a project with allocated time and a clear beginning and end will allow your team to take it as seriously as they would any other project.

2. Keep everything in one place.
The biggest time sucker and energy drainer is the simple act of searching for stuff - resumés, passwords, email convos, templates. They're likely spread out over different tools and platforms like Google Drive, a shared email inbox, Slack, your CMS, whatever. A game-changer is to keep everything in one place. A place where everything is automatically kept that is also the place where you and your team can perform the tasks around hiring. This is key! A place where things are kept and where things get done. If you use simple hiring software like Homerun, your team can find everything by just logging in. This is also the place where you and your team can perform tasks like:
• Create and publish job posts
• Receive applications from candidates
• Rate candidates
• Email candidates
• Message with your team about candidates and tasks

With Homerun job posts you can use an application form so when candidates apply, all their info is automatically organized in a handy candidate overview like this one:

An important note is that Homerun is simple to use, so a lack of tech savviness won't create new hurdles for your team. There's no training needed to use Homerun.

3. Have clear roles for everyone in the hiring team.
If everyone in your hiring team has a clear role it will be so much easier for them to take ownership over their tasks related to hiring. Make sure to be very explicit about the tasks that belong to each role. Does the copy writer just write the job description or also publish it? Does the hiring manager make sure everyone has given input about each candidate or is that someone else? Also, be sure to appoint one final decision maker to avoid confusion about who has the final say.

4. Create clarity about what you're evaluating candidates on.
Ambiguity about what you're looking for in a candidate can lead to big unfruitful (and frustrating) discussions. It happens that some team members only evaluate from their own perspective. They become hyper focused on the candidate's skills that will help their projects along even though the role will go beyond those projects. Solve this by creating score cards that clearly list the traits and skills the candidates will be evaluated on. To find out how to create a score card, have a look at our Guide to Job Interviewing.

5. Provide your team with the right materials, right when it matters.
Since your team isn't made up of pro recruiters, sending over some documents and resources at the moment that they'll need them will be a great help. This saves your team research time and it'll help them focus on the right things when it's time for them to perform their hiring tasks. For example, share your score cards and an interview guide (like this one) the day before your colleague has an interview planned with a candidate. This way their focus will go to prepping a great interview instead of researching the best interview practices.

6. Share progress with the entire team along the way.
Keep your team in the loop. Hiring a new team member is exciting for everyone involved so share the fun. And not just with the hiring team! Let the whole company know how many qualified people applied, when candidates are coming by for interviews, and when you're getting close to a hire. This helps to build it into your company culture that hiring is a shared responsibility. Team members that are not involved in one hiring round will get excited to be involved in a next hire.

For further reading have a look at:

4 types of hiring bias and how to avoid them

Homerun's Guide to Job Interviewing

A great application form: a joy for candidates and a solution for hiring chaos.

Related articles

Subscribe to our newsletter

Subscribe to our popular bi-weekly newsletter packed
with tips and tricks on hiring, and good job inspiration.

Start your free
Homerun trial today

Start free trial